Two eyewitnesses reunite once a year on anniversary of Kennedy's death 

THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS/Nov. 23, 2012

It was the two old men everyone gravitated toward. The tourists, the filmmakers, the conspiracy theorists. They all crowded around the men near the grassy knoll, two people who witnessed history.

John Templin sat quietly in a folding chair. After a dozen heart procedures, he let his friend of more than 50 years do most of the talking. Ernest Brandt chatted zealously about what he'd seen the day President John F. Kennedy died. He waved around a blurry photo - proof he'd been there.

On the 49th anniversary of Kennedy's assassination Thursday, these two old friends embarked on their annual tradition of meeting downtown at Dealey Plaza. They fielded questions and reminisced near the curb where they'd stood together on the afternoon of Nov. 22, 1963.

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Photo Credit: The Dallas Morning News 

Dallas joins others in boosting cinema security after Colorado massacre 

THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS/July 21, 2012

Dallas theaters joined others across the nation Friday in ramping up security, a relief to nervous filmgoers but leaving some to wonder whether even drastic measures can stop a crazed gunman.

Many theaters are bringing in more police, one national movie chain is banning “costumes that make others feel uncomfortable,” and law officers are increasing patrols in response to the Colorado massacre.

The fallout from the shooting at the premiere of the The Dark Knight Rises was swift and widespread.

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Toledoan arrested in fatal beating

THE TOLEDO BLADE/July 12, 2012

A Toledo woman was beaten to death over the weekend by her boyfriend at the Regina Manor apartment complex where they lived, according to police and witnesses.

Police responded to a missing-person call about 8:40 p.m. Saturday and found Vanessa Tucker, 53, dead inside the apartment. Her head and face were beaten, Toledo Police Chief Mike Navarre said.

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Survivor of child sex trafficking speaks at SMU law enforcement conference

THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS/July 17, 2012

For nearly 20 years, Holly Austin Smith thought of herself as a prostitute. She looked back at those 36 hours she spent in Atlantic City, N.J., wearing red high heels, and she thought she had chosen that for herself.

It was only recently that it clicked for Smith: she was never a prostitute. She had been a 14-year-old girl who didn’t think she was pretty enough to wear dresses. She had been a victim who was manipulated and exploited.

At a conference Monday at Southern Methodist University, Smith spoke about her experience, so law enforcement could learn from her story.

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Photo Credit: The Dallas Morning News